How to Handle IDRC Non-Compliance Matters After Pleading to a DWI in New Jersey

In the state of New Jersey, a program titled the Intoxicated Driving Resource Center (IDRC), is the required program for anyone that pleads guilty to a DWI. The program requires mandatory Alcohol and Highway Safety Education courses that are typically 12 to 48 hours for first offenders. In addition to the mandatory courses, IDRC conducts an evaluation on each individual in order to determine the extent of their alcohol or drug dependency and whether or not treatment is necessary. If treatment is in fact necessary then the completion of a 16-week minimum treatment plan is mandatory. The assigned treatment plan can be either an outpatient treatment program or inpatient program. Both programs include intensive drug/alcohol counseling in the form of self-help groups, family treatment centers, and individual or group counseling. Throughout the whole process, IDRC monitors and reports on people’s program compliance to the municipal courts. The center also makes recommendations regarding license suspensions or restorations to the Motor Vehicle Commission. For this reason, it is very important for New Jersey drivers to be in compliance with the program.

Though the program is intended to benefit individuals, the process can be complicated. Many program enrollees have difficulty communicating with the IDRC. Due to this, many individuals are considered non-compliant. Being found incompliant can be a result of failing to attend assigned meetings, failing to participate in counseling, or failing to attend self-help group meetings. Being considered non-compliant can result in various sanctions. One sanction is receiving a license suspension for an extended period of time. This can be very problematic, and require the assistance of an attorney to resolve the situation. At the Law Offices of Eric B. Morrell we have extensive experience in handling IDRC matters and are well equipped to solve any arising issues. We understand our client’s frustrations in regards to communicating with the IDRC. Our law offices have assisted many clients in resolving their IDRC complications.

Our law office was recently retained in the matter of a female New Jersey driver, who lost her license for an extended period of time. This was due to receiving a failure to comply notice from the IDRC. As a mother of three, being unable to drive her children to school and activities was a burden in her day-to-day life. This occurred despite the fact that she was already enrolled in a treatment program. The issues originated after her insurance was declined at the program facility she had enrolled in. This required her to get in contact with the IDRC in order to receive an updated list of treatment center that would accept her insurance. After finally getting in contact with the IDRC, she still had yet to receive a list of suitable facilities, which led to her enrollment to be delayed. Punishment for failing to satisfy the IDRC program requirements ranges from having driving privileges revoked to an imposition of 2 days in prison. Our law offices were able to resolve both situations for the client. Our office was able to have the Court schedule a date in which we went before a Judge with the necessary evidence to prove our client had previously enrolled in a treatment program. As such her New Jersey license was successfully reinstated.

This IDRC example is one of the many matters our law office has successfully resolved. Failing to respond to non-compliance notices in a timely and appropriate manner may result in strict repercussions. This is why it is extremely important to retain a law office familiar with how the IDRC functions. The Law Offices of Eric B. Morrell have resources and experience to assist you with your IDRC non-compliance issues. Many law offices do not wish to deal with IDRC matters, yet we take the time to communicate with the many IDRC County offices throughout New Jersey. The Law Offices of Eric B. Morrell have produced great results for our clients in order to resolve their IDRC matters.